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Research is an limitless source of news, new perspectives, and in-depth features. Expertsanswer’s network of research communicators provides you as a journalist with a quick link to Swedish researchers and experts who can offer comments, explanations, and new angles on a subject.

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Radiocarbon dates show the origins of megalith graves and how they spread across Europe

13 February, 2019 - Göteborgs universitet

How did European megalith graves arise and spread? Using radiocarbon dates from a large quantity of material, an archaeologist at the University of Gothenburg has been able to show that people in the younger Stone Age were far more mobile than previously thought, had quite advanced seafaring skills, and that there were exchanges between different […]

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Hard-to-detect antibiotic resistance an underestimated clinical problem

11 February, 2019 - Uppsala universitet

When antibiotics are used to treat bacteria susceptible to them, the treatment usually works. Nevertheless, the antibiotic chosen is sometimes ineffective. One of the reasons for this is heteroresistance, a phenomenon explored in depth by Uppsala and Emory University researchers in a new study.

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1.1 million Swedish Kronor to research project on environmental pollution in the Baltic Sea and coastal farmland

5 February, 2019 - Linnéuniversitetet

Marcelo Ketzer, professor of environmental science, and Mats Åström, professor of environmental geology, have been granted SEK 760,000 and SEK 375,000 respectively by SGU, Geological Survey of Sweden, for a new research project and a continuation project at Linnaeus University. “It feels great to receive this contribution that makes it possible for us to start […]

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The 210-million-year-old Smok was crushing bones like a hyena

31 January, 2019 - Uppsala universitet

Coprolites, or fossil droppings, of the dinosaur-like archosaur Smok wawelski contain lots of chewed-up bone fragments. This led researchers at Uppsala University to conclude that this top predator was exploiting bones for salt and marrow, a behavior often linked to mammals but seldom to archosaurs.

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