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Press releases

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Diabetes patients still produce insulin

22 June, 2017 - Uppsala universitet

Some insulin is still produced in almost half of the patients that have had type 1 diabetes for more than ten years. The study conducted by researchers at Uppsala University in Sweden has now been published online by the medical journal Diabetes Care.

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35 million SEK for interdisciplinary research on plant stress responses

16 June, 2017 - Umeå universitet

Åsa Strand, Stefan Björklund and Martin Rosvall, all researchers at Umeå University, have been awarded 35 million SEK from the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research for a five-year research program on systems biology. The interdisciplinary project aims to map how plants react to abiotic stresses such as drought or extreme temperatures.

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Genetic differences across species guide vocal learning in juvenile songbirds

12 June, 2017 - Uppsala universitet

Juvenile birds discriminate and selectively learn their own species’ songs even when primarily exposed to the songs of other species, but the underlying mechanism has remained unknown. A new study, by researchers at Uppsala University, shows that song discrimination arises due to genetic differences between species, rather than early learning or other mechanisms.

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3D-modelling of food residues in 230 million years old fossil faeces

5 June, 2017 - Uppsala universitet

Synchrotron scanning can produce high-quality 3D models of well-preserved food residues from fossil faeces. That’s the result of a new study, by palaeontologists from Uppsala University and from ESRF Grenoble, which is presented in a new article in Scientific Reports.

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