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Research is an limitless source of news, new perspectives, and in-depth features. Expertsanswer’s network of research communicators provides you as a journalist with a quick link to Swedish researchers and experts who can offer comments, explanations, and new angles on a subject.

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Press releases

Ions in molten salts can go “against the flow”

27 January, 2021 - Uppsala universitet

In a new article a research group at Uppsala University show, using computer simulations, that ions do not always behave as expected. In their research on molten salts, they were able to see that, in some cases, the ions in the salt mixture they were studying affect one another so much that they may even move in the “wrong” direction – that is, towards an electrode with the same charge.

Few indications that the new media landscape leads to increasing polarisation in society

25 January, 2021 - Göteborgs universitet

Increasing political polarisation is often attributed to the internet and the dramatic increase in access to sources of information – also known as the new media landscape. Media researcher Peter M. Dahlgren, however, has not seen any sign of this in Sweden. On the contrary, his new thesis shows that the problem is considerably smaller than […]

Tough childhood damages life prospects

21 January, 2021 - Uppsala universitet

An adverse upbringing often impairs people’s circumstances and health in their adult years, especially for couples who have both had similar experiences. This is shown by a new study, carried out by Uppsala University researchers, in which 818 mothers and their partners filled in a questionnaire one year after having a child together. The study is now published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE.

Antibiotic resistance may spread even more easily than expected

21 January, 2021 - Chalmers tekniska högskola

Pathogenic bacteria in humans are developing resistance to antibiotics much faster than expected. Now, computational research at Chalmers University of Technology shows that one reason could be significant genetic transfer between bacteria in our ecosystems and to humans. This work has also led to new tools for resistance researchers. According to the World Health Organisation, […]

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