Press releases

Science

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1.1 million Swedish Kronor to research project on environmental pollution in the Baltic Sea and coastal farmland

5 February, 2019 - Linnéuniversitetet

Marcelo Ketzer, professor of environmental science, and Mats Åström, professor of environmental geology, have been granted SEK 760,000 and SEK 375,000 respectively by SGU, Geological Survey of Sweden, for a new research project and a continuation project at Linnaeus University. “It feels great to receive this contribution that makes it possible for us to start […]

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Avian influenza in Bangladesh: the role of migratory birds in the transmission of disease

28 January, 2019 - Linnéuniversitetet

Avian influenza is a devastating disease in poultry, caused highly-pathogenic avian influenza viruses. The virus infects both wild and domestic birds and an important epidemiological question is to which extent wild waterfowl contribute to long-distance dispersal of disease. Jonas Waldenström and Mariëlle van Toor at Linnaeus University have now been granted SEK 3.5 million to […]

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Genetic ‘Toolkit’ Helps Periwinkles Gain Advantage on the Seashore

8 August, 2018 - Göteborgs universitet

Periwinkles, struggling to survive the seashore battleground, have developed a genetic ‘toolkit’ to help them adapt to different environments, a new study shows. This toolkit has enabled the snail to develop different characteristics according to whether it lives mainly on parts of the sea shore where crabs are a constant threat, or in rocky places […]

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Scientists Identify Most Pressing Research Issues Posed by Chemicals in the Environment

8 August, 2018 - Göteborgs universitet

An international study, involving scientists from the University of Gothenburg, has identified the 22 most important research questions that need to be answered to fill the most pressing knowledge gaps over the next decade. “The study provides an overview of the major issues at hand. This includes the chemicals we should be most concerned about, […]

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Deep biosphere microbes expand the chemical signatures of life

27 June, 2018 - Linnéuniversitetet

Search for signs of ancient microbial life in the geological record is challenging due to degradation of the primary organic material. Therefore, proof of biogenic origin often relies on chemical signatures that microorganisms leave behind. A new study of minerals in rock cracks presents chemical signatures that are definite proofs of widespread ancient life processes […]

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Intelligent maps will help robots navigate in your home

19 June, 2018 - Högskolan i Halmstad

Automated mobile robots have the capacity to help us with many service tasks, such as home care assistance or moving goods in a warehouse. Since robots lack human senses, they depend on sensors and other sources for navigation. New research from Halmstad University in Sweden suggests methods for enabling robots to better understand and become more aware of their surroundings, so that they can efficiently adapt their movements in a complex work space.

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CSR in the context of globalisation

15 June, 2018 - Högskolan i Halmstad

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has been a hot topic for the last few years. The focus has however been on North America and Europe, at least when it comes to research. But, when firms with their origin in high-income countries enter markets in some of the African countries, the approach to CSR related practices changes. Contexts and circumstances influence how responsibility is interpreted. New doctoral thesis from Halmstad University.

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Carpe solis – sunbathing fish defy the laws of nature

31 May, 2018 - Linnéuniversitetet

That sunbathing may require a refreshing swim to avoid overheating is a vacation experience shared by many. It has been assumed that this cooling effect of water prevents fish from reaping the rewards of sunbathing available to animals in terrestrial environments. New evidence on behavior of carp, published in the Royal Society journal Proceedings B,challenges […]

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You walk talks

18 May, 2018 - Högskolan i Halmstad

The way you walk can reveal current and future health problems. New research from Halmstad University suggests the use of wearable sensors for analysing your movement. This can potentially result in early detection of for example Parkinson’s disease, dementia, multiple sclerosis and other neuro-physiological disorders. Many of our body systems, such as the cardio-vascular system […]

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Few jobs can be completely replaced by new technologies

12 February, 2018 - Handelshögskolan i Stockholm

Artificial intelligence, machine learning, and robotics can perform an increasingly wider variety of jobs, and automation is no longer confined to routine tasks. Nevertheless, the automation potential for non-routine tasks seems to remain limited, especially for tasks involving autonomous mobility, creativity, problem solving, and complex communication.  

The new report The Substitution of Labor: From technological feasibility to other factors influencing job automation is the fifth report from the three-year research project, The Internet and its Direct and Indirect Effects on Innovation and the Swedish Economy under the leadership of Professor Robin Teigland.