Press releases

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Hotade skalbaggar gynnas av skogsgallring

7 May, 2019 - Göteborgs universitet

Vedlevande skalbaggar som utnyttjar ekar är en artrik och hotad djurgrupp i det moderna sydsvenska skogs- och jordbrukslandskapet. Ny forskning från Göteborgs universitet visar att skötsel med naturvårdsgallring kan vara ett effektivt sätt att långsiktigt gynna dessa skalbaggar.

När traditionellt skogsbruk övergick i modernt under 1900-talet, blev många av de syd- och mellansvenska skogarna tätare och mörkare än de tidigare varit. För många arter i solbelysta och öppna skogar, och som har eken som sitt livsutrymme, har det inneburit en ökad risk för utdöende.

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New research helps visualise sentiment and stance in social media

29 April, 2019 - Linnéuniversitetet

How can you find and make sense of opinions and emotions in the vast amount of texts in social media? Kostiantyn Kucher’s research helps visualise for instance public opinions on political issues in tweets over time. In the future, analysis and visualisation of sentiment and stance could contribute to such tasks as detection of hate […]

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New discovery could lead to improved blood sugar level control

26 April, 2019 - Uppsala universitet

Many diabetes patients do not only have problems with their insulin, but also with the release of the hormone glucagon. Researchers at Uppsala University have now discovered a regulation mechanism which could provide an opportunity to improve blood glucose control in these patients. The research is published in the journal Diebetologia.

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Rare disease gives new insight into regulatory T cell function

23 April, 2019 - Karolinska Institutet

An international study led from Sweden’s Karolinska Institutetprovides new insights into the regulatory T cells’ role in protecting against autoimmune disease. By mapping the targets of the immune system in patients with the rare disease IPEX, they were able to show that regulatory T cells control immunotolerance in the gut. The results are published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Megalith tombs were family graves in European Stone Age

15 April, 2019 - Uppsala universitet

In a new study published in PNAS, an international research team, led from Uppsala University, discovered kin relationships among Stone Age individuals buried in megalithic tombs on Ireland and in Sweden. The kin relations can be traced for more than ten generations and suggests that megaliths were graves for kindred groups in Stone Age northwestern Europe.

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New research supports volcanic origin of Kiruna-type iron ores

12 April, 2019 - Uppsala universitet

The origin of giant apatite-iron oxide ores of the so-called ‘Kiruna-type’ has been the topic of a long standing debate that has lasted for over 100 years. In a new article, published in Nature Communications, a team of scientists presents new and unambiguous data in favour of a magmatic origin for these important iron ores. The study was led by researchers from Uppsala University in Sweden.

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Origin of Scandinavian wolves clarified

29 March, 2019 - Uppsala universitet

There are no signs that hybrids of dog and wolf have contributed to the Scandinavian wolf population – a matter that has been discussed, especially in Norway. These wolves appear to have originated from the Nordic region or adjacent parts of Northern Europe, new genetic research from Uppsala University shows.

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New research project on the impact of extreme weather on biodiversity and pollinating insects

13 March, 2019 - Linnéuniversitetet

Markus Franzén, doctor in ecology at the department of biology and environmental science at Linnaeus University, has been granted SEK 3 million by Formas for his research project Cascading effects of drought on farming/grazing and farmland biodiversity. The drought in Sweden during the summer of 2018 led to acute food shortage for livestock and became […]

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Two genes explain variation in color and behavior in the wall lizard

1 March, 2019 - Uppsala universitet

How are reptiles capable of generating such a diversity of bright colors? And how is it possible that within a single population of the same species, different individuals exhibit strikingly different coloration patterns? A team of scientists reveal two genes implicated in yellow to red pigmentation in reptiles, and demonstrate that these “pigmentation genes” also affect behavior and other traits.

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Should we be screening future parents for genetic disorders?

1 March, 2019 - Uppsala universitet

Should public health-care systems provide couples with expanded screening for genetic disorders before they decide to become pregnant? Screening programmes could increase our reproductive choices and autonomy. But there are ethical issues at stake.